Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Wild Yeast Hearth Bread

This bread is not a soft sandwich type bread like most of the other sourdough bread recipes I've shared. This is a hearth style bread that has the crispy crust and chewy crumb that is perfect with a bowl of soup!

I started using this recipe with mostly white flour and only a little whole wheat flour. The above picture shows this bread. But gradually I've been using more and more whole wheat flour until now I'm using all whole wheat. The photo below is 100% whole wheat. The crust is not as crispy when using whole wheat, neither do I get as large of holes in the interior, but we still love it. If you choose to use all or some white flour, you will probably need slightly more flour.

Wild Yeast Hearth Bread


6 cup whole wheat flour (or white if you prefer)
2 1/2 cup water
1 1/4 cup active starter
1 T honey
3 tsp salt

Mix all ingredients except salt just until combined. Allow dough to rest for 30 minutes.

Add salt and mix on low or medium speed for 5 minutes.

Transfer to oiled bowl. Allow to rise for 3 hours. During rise, at each hour, stretch and fold the dough.

After rise, turn onto counter and divide into loaves. Make two large or four small loaves. Shape into round or oblong loaves and allow to rise for 2-3 hours.

Preheat the oven to 475 degrees. Slash loaves, mist with water, place in oven, turn heat down to 450 degrees, and bake for about 30 minutes. The crust should be a deep brown.

For even better crust and oven spring, cover loaf with roasting pan lid for the first 12 minutes of baking time to add humidity.

If you wish, you may allow the shaped dough to rise for about 1 1/2 hours and then refrigerate for 2 hours or up until a day. Bake directly out of the refrigerator with no warm up time needed.

 

I like to form the dough into a round loaf and place it seam side up in a VERY well greased bowl. Cover with plastic wrap. When taking out of the fridge, the dough will be risen to fill the bowl. Turn out of bowl onto a baking sheet, score and bake immediately. This gives a lovely golden blistered crust.




I like the refrigerator method especially when we are having guests. It is nice to have all the prep work done the day before but still have fresh hot bread out of the oven.

To find more sourdough information and recipes, check out the sourdough page.

30 comments :

  1. What type of bakeware are you using? My current baking sheets are wearing out and I want to invest in good quality ones for whatever I buy next I've never seen anything like I see in your last 2 pictures
    Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Why is it called 'wild yeast'? Thanks for all of the recipes that you post. I love them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's not store-bought. A yeast starter will inoculate with many wild strains of yeast and lactobacillus (the bacteria that helps give sourdough its flavor) if it's just kept moist and fed with flour. Wild yeast, as opposed to instant yeast, which is only one species of fast-rising yeast, or an inoculated yeast from somewhere else, such as San Francisco, etc (I.e. San Francisco sourdough).

      Delete
  3. Simone-
    I use a stainless steel baking sheet. What you see in the photo is the silicone mat. I love using the mat. I don't need to grease the pan or use parchment paper. It is easy to clean and rolls for storage.

    Melissa -
    "Wild yeast" is another name for "sourdough."

    Gina

    ReplyDelete
  4. I've been interested in this type of bread for a long time, but the recipes I've seen all call for it to be baked in a Dutch oven. I like that this will still hold it's shape without needing a Dutch oven to bake it in. I'm definitely bookmarking this one.

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  5. The bread looks delicious! Every homemade bread recipe I have ever tried has always tasted ok, had a great crust, but the inside always has a shiny appearance. Any idea what I may be doing wrong? Also, how do you make sourdough starter or did you buy it somewhere? I would like to start making sourdough bread because I heard that it is healthier.
    Your blog has helped me so much with gardening, homeschool, and so much more. Love it!
    Thanks for your help!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Nicole -
    I'm not sure what you mean by your bread having a shiny appearance. Is the dough raw?

    As for getting a sourdough starter, I wrote all about that here. http://homejoys.blogspot.com/2011/05/starting-sourdough.html

    Happy Baking,
    Gina

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  7. Good evening, Gina~

    This recipe sounds absolutely WONDERFUL! Thank you so much for sharing it!

    Blessings~
    Laura

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  8. Thanks for the link to the sourdough starter!
    When I bake my bread, the dough gets cooked (I have even tested with a skewer like you would when you bake a cake-comes out clean), it just has a shiny appearance. Like a table that has shellac or polyurethane on it is shiny, that's what the insides of my bread look like. I didn't know if it was a problem with kneading (too much or not enough), my oven, liquid content or what.
    Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Nicole -
    Bread can't be tested with a skewer like a cake. You know bread is finished when it sounds hollow when tapped, when it is nicely browned all over, or when the interior reaches a certain temperature. Is the bread dry inside, or is it gummy? You may need to bake it longer.
    Gina

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  10. Your breads are stunning! These recipes make me so excited to start experimenting with sourdough!

    ReplyDelete
  11. What is the difference between a starter and an active starter? I have a sourdough starter from Cultures For Health but have yet to start it because it all looks so confusing it with feeding it, etc.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Anonymous -
    An active starter is one that is being fed regularly and is bubbly. I'd encourage you to jump into sourdough. Once you do it, it isn't near as complicated as it appears!
    You can check the sourdough tab at the top of my blog to find more info.
    Gina

    ReplyDelete
  13. Hi Gina,

    I'm new to the sourdough game, and my first attempts have been kind of embarrassing. I just made this recipe of yours for the second time, the first time was so-so and this second time tasted...oh, words can't describe how delicious it was, but it did not rise well, which was my issue the first time. I don't have a mixer, and the dough is SO wet (my starter is probably 80% hydration?) I use the stretch and fold method instead of kneading prior to rise, as well as every hour like you say. I bake the bread in a preheated, parchment-lined dutch oven, but seriously it's so wet I can't even score it before baking. Needless to say it has very little oven spring! I don't know what I'm doing wrong. My starter is a couple of months old and seems boisterous, and I live in San Diego and it's summertime so it isn't the weather, I'm sure. Do you have any advice for me?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Melissa-
      It think that you need to add more flour if it is too wet to score. Keep working at it and hopefully you'll find the bread of your dreams!
      Gina

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  14. We will be making the English muffins with a cast iron griddle oN campiing trips. Easy bread to make on the road.

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  15. Hi Gina! I baked this bread today and it looks beautiful! I did it in the bread machine, whole wheat dough cycle, then turned it off before the baking part started and left the dough in there to rise. Boy, did it rise! I was tempted to bake in the machine but my kids love the crust if casserole baked bread very much, so I put the dough in a cane basket and baked in a casserole. It's beautiful!

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  16. So I wanted to say thank you for showing me this method, previously I had only tried no knead sourdough. Next time I will try baking in the machine. What a pity I can't upload picture of the bread, it looks quite different from yours. My sourdough makes the top crack but it just makes it look more rustic!

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  17. What size are the bowls you are using to let this rise? I want to try this recipe, but don't want to put it in either too large or too small of a bowl. Thank you!
    - Jennifer

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jennifer -
      Use a bowl that is about twice the size as your ball of dough. This will give room for expansion.
      Happy Baking,
      Gina

      Delete
  18. I'm glad I stumbled across your blog. Your sourdough posts provide lots of practical information and I'm happy to learn all I can. I have been baking sourdough for a couple of weeks now but feel very unsure of what I'm doing and want to get better! Blessings to you and yours, ~Stacy www.withgreatjoy.blogspot.com

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  19. I use a meat thermometer and temp my breads at 200 , is the dough dense and wet ? I think that maybe your shiny bread just a thought great baking to all

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  20. Thank you for an easy but delicious recipe, I love that I can refrigerate the dough until the next day. Everyone I talk to about homemade sourdough says they are too lazy to make it but I can't wait to give them a loaf of your recipe, it'll change their mind! The starter is the arduous part, the dough is simple! 👌🏻

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  21. Hi Gina, I use many of your recipes with delight. I still have one question. Sometimes recipes call for starter. Others call for 'active' starter. Do some recipes use starter straight from the refrigerator without having added to it first?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great question. I usually try to specify "active" starter for recipes that must have the starter recently fed and bubbly. But some recipes such as crackers, English muffins, and waffles - it is okay to have cold dormant starter. Of course, active starter is always preferred, but it will work with discarded starter as well.
      Hope that makes sense.
      Happy Baking,
      Gina

      Delete
  22. Hi Gina! Why is it that you suggest in many of your recipes to add the salt at the end? Also, what is the purpose of the 20 minute rest time?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Bekah,
      The salt is added at the end by many professional bakers to help in the gluten formation. But I often add it all together because I'm so scatterbrained that I forget to add it later.

      You can read this post to learn about the rest time.
      http://homejoys.blogspot.com/2011/01/rest.html
      Happy Baking,
      Gina

      Delete
  23. Hello,
    I have a question about my bread. It is rising beautifully and when I go to dump it out to bake it, it deflates into this flat piece of dough. Not sure what I am doing wrong. This is all new to me. I am using regular bowls and I oiled and floured them, the dough does seem to be a little more wet, wet enough that I couldn't score it, but not so wet that I can't work with it if that makes sense. Thank you for your help!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There is a couple things you could try. Not allowing the dough to rise as long. Adding slightly more flour. Or placing it in a loaf pan and baking it in the pan so you are not moving it.
      Happy Baking,
      Gina

      Delete

I'm still learning how to be a joyful homemaker and I'd love to hear from you!

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