Monday, April 20, 2015

Hog Maw Casserole





As a lover of one pot meals, this recipe from my friend Regina S. has become a favorite - for the cook and the family. I cube bread crusts and keep them in the freezer for this recipe.

This is a favorite for Sunday lunch. There is nothing better than walking into the house after church to the smell of Hog Maw Stuffing Casserole.

Some might be saying "Hog Maw? What is that?" And maybe you don't want to know.

Another friend, Regina R. shared a tutorial on hog maw last year. This Pennsylvania Dutch delicacy might be one of those recipes you have to grow up on to appreciate. My mom always used the recipe in the Mennonite Community Cookbook.

The difference of this recipe from my mom's is that it contains bread cubes. We love the addition. And though it can be stuffed in the traditional pig stomach - I never do. I just place it in a casserole dish and cover it with foil. Easy.



I am sharing the recipe as Regina S. shared it with me though I only use these measurements as a guide. Basically I start with a large bowl and just start adding ingredients. Usually I end up with enough for two casserole dishes - which is perfect because my family loves to have plenty of leftovers.



Regina adds several slices of cooked and chopped bacon on top. I let it out and didn't seem to miss it though I'm sure it would be delicious. Bacon makes everything better.

Hog Maw Casserole
adapted from Regina S.

1 onion, chopped
1 small cabbage, chopped
2 cups diced potatoes
2 cups bulk sausage, raw
1 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
2 eggs
1 cup milk
4 slices of bread, cubed

Beat eggs; add milk, salt, and pepper. Pour over bread cubes. Stir in cabbage, onion, potatoes, and sausage. Cover and bake at 400 for 60 minutes.

13 comments :

  1. When you bake this on Sunday morning could you tell what temperature and how long you normally keep it in the oven? I love recipes that I can pop in the oven before leaving for Sunday school but always am unsure of what temp to set the oven to be sure it's done but not all dried out.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I use the time bake setting on my oven so it turns on an hour before we plan to arrive home. I'm guessing that you also could put it at a lower heat (300-325) and have it in the oven for 2-3 hours.
      Gina

      Delete
  2. Growing up in an African American home Mama made this hog maws all the time. She would make a pot of pinto beans and corn bread. Yum! Yum!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Pintos and cornbread - - great! Need some greens with pepper- vinegar, too. :) I visited your blog and I like it. Because I'm not registered with Google (by my preference), I can't comment at your blog, so I let you know here.
      Philippa

      Delete
  3. Hmm... never heard of it.. but it sounds so delish!! I'll have to try it.

    When you said the line "maybe you don't' want to know" what's in it... my first thought was - Is this a recipe that uses Scrapple? meaning - as another way to eat or serve Scrapple. :)
    This recipe sounds rather simple and I can see why it would used as a stuffing.

    thanks for sharing!!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Love the name, and the recipe! Think I'll try this, and surprise my family with the name only after they are smacking their lips and asking for more!!

    ReplyDelete
  5. I grew up with meals like this. My German Great Grandma made this for me one summer when I was visiting them in Wisconsin. They cooked on a wood stove. They had an outhouse.
    So when we butchered, we did the same thing. We used everything we could.
    Another favorite dish was scrapple.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I guess it could be said that this is Pennsylvania Dutch/Mennonite haggis, sort of. :) Gina, is the sausage you use stuffed in hog maw casing? Otherwise, I'm unsure how it can be hog maw casserole if you don't stuff the whole thing into a hog maw. Please excuse my ignorance on this.
    Philippa

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This recipe is typically stuffed into a pig stomach - but I don't. I just put it in a dish. So no, it is not really a hog maw at all. But we still call it that.

      Sorry for the confusion.
      Gina

      Delete
  7. This looks good! And easy. :) I might event try it with some of my homemade sourdough bread.

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  8. Wow, so easy and looks delicious. I'll certainly be trying this one.
    Blessings Gail

    ReplyDelete
  9. This sounds interesting and seems a kind of twist on an English dish we eat, Bubbles and Squeaks. There are versions of it - mine is frying up leftover beef, cabbage, and potatoes.

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I'm still learning how to be a joyful homemaker and I'd love to hear from you!

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