Monday, March 19, 2018

Book Review: Why God Calls Us to Dangerous Places



In the Land of Blue Burqas by Kate McCord was probably the best book I read last year. (My review.) I was eager to read McCord's book, Why God Calls Us To Dangerous Places,because some people I love are sharing Christ in physically violent locations.

Kate McCord (not her real name but a protective pseudonym) shares insights from her years of living in Afghanistan.  She also shares interviews from other individuals and their families who lived in dangerous places. McCord did not minimize the difficulties of living in such situations, but by sharing her story and the stories of others, she demonstrated the rewards of following Christ's example of leaving the comfort and security of home to share God's love.

I didn't expect the book to be so personally inspiring. I have no plans to get on a plane and travel to a place where speaking Christ's name could mean death. But I was reminded that God loves us so much that He was willing to sacrifice His Son so we could have a relationship with Him.

Since I was reading this book in the hospital, I found all sorts of connections to our cancer journey (though I don't pretend to face the trials of a persecuted believer). It is often in the difficult experiences that God shows us more clearly His tender love for His children. And it makes me more eager to share His love with others.

And, to me, that was the point of Why God Calls Us to Dangerous Places. It is knowing that God loves all people and wanting desperately to share His love with all the people of the world. This is a short book and a quick read, but each chapter contains thoughtful study questions to help the reader gain personal insight.

Whether God is calling you to serve in a dangerous place, or someone you love is considering moving to a dangerous place, or you are called enter into a messy relationship with a neighbor that needs Christ - this book may give you a new perspective.

This post contains affiliate links.

6 comments :

  1. The comments have all disappeared for me. Thanks for your suggestions but I’d love to read some others, too.

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    1. No comments on this post yet except yours but if you go to this post http://homejoys.blogspot.com/2017/08/off-shelf.html you can find lots of comments with book suggestions.
      Gina

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  2. Thanks, I just requested it from the library. Hope all is going well.

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  3. I’ve enjoyed “Being Mortal” by Atul Gawande - he describes our North American culture and its failure to properly respect and look after our elderly persons, suggesting some important and innovative ideas on how to do that much better.
    Another favorite would be “The Bible tells me so” by Peter Enns. The Bible isn’t a problem to be fixed- rather it’s an invitation to a deeper trust in God. This academic has written a very readable book.
    And how about “Mended” by Angie Smith? She explores the idea that we seem to think that it’s our responsibility to fix things. Is it possible that God is really waiting for us to allow him to mend what is broken?
    (Re)Union by pastor, Bruxy Cavey - Jesus too often gets disfigured by religious rules; this book strips those things away, seeking God’s kingdom here on earth as it is in heaven.
    Also books by Sarah Bessey and Brene Brown.
    I read a lot of secular novels. I don’t find many Christian writers of fiction whom I enjoy - so often the storyline or the conversation is unrealistic. I look forward to hearing some suggestions regarding good Christian fiction.

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  4. "...you are called enter into a messy relationship with a neighbor that needs Christ..." I was unsure this book was for me till I read this part of your review. I have been looking for ways to bring Christ to a certain neighbor. She leads a dissolute life and says she "loves" her awful choices. Yet she has asked for physical help when those choices lead to bad situations. I hope this book will be of use. Thank you, Gina.
    Prayers for Ed and all of you continue. Thank you for your posts on Ed's story.

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  5. I’ve just discovered your blog. It’s so honest. Thank you.

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I'm still learning how to be a joyful homemaker and I'd love to hear from you!

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