Tuesday, October 15, 2013

How to Make Tomato Powder

I said I wouldn't put another tomato into a jar.

But I had to try one more project before closing down the garden season.

And it wasn't canning, so it didn't count. Definitely the easiest tomato preserving I have done all summer!

I have learned so much from you readers. The idea of making tomato powder came from a reader's email. She gave me permission to share some of her tips and directions with you.














First I washed and cored my tomatoes. Then I sliced them to about 1/4 inch slices. I layered the slices as close as possible (touching but not overlapping) on the dehydrator trays. I did not skin or remove the seeds of the tomatoes. Most of my tomatoes were small paste-type tomatoes but any kind will work, even cherry tomatoes!



I dried the tomatoes until they were crunchy and brittle. I wanted them to be drier than when I made sun-dried tomatoes.



Then I blended the tomatoes into a powder in my blender.



My dehydrator full of tomatoes made over a pint of tomato powder. Though it should be fine stored in a dark, cool place, I chose to store it in my freezer so that it does not absorb moisture and cake up.

In the few weeks that I have made the tomato powder, I have found it very easy to use. I especially like it for tomato paste. It is so easy to mix some powder in hot water and have instant paste. I also like adding a spoonful or so to a pot of soup.

Here is the hydration ratios that were shared with me.
Tomato Paste: 1 t. powder and 1 t. water.
Tomato Sauce: 1 t. powder and 3 t. water
Tomato Soup: 1 t. powder and 1 t. water and 2 t. cream.
Tomato Juice: 1 t. powder and 1/2  c. water or more
 
I think that the few jars of tomato powder that I have made won't last long!
 
Have you ever made tomato powder?

27 comments :

  1. Now this would be a fantastic reason to get a dehydrator! I've never had one, but always seem to have an abundance of tomatoes to get rid of after I've had my fill of canning. So simple. Thank you for sharing with us.
    Blessings,
    Betsy
    http://www.betsy-thesimplelifeofaqueen.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  2. I love this and will try it! Another way to store powder for an extended time would be to use the seal-a-meal thing! The seal-a-meal gadge,t bags the product and seals it after all the air is removed.
    Always enjoy your blog!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If you want to store tomato powder for long time,please read this paper: http://www.nvc.nl/userfiles/files/Tomato_powder.pdf

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  3. I have made tomato powder, too. I used the leftovers from making sauce(the skin and seeds that were left in the food mill). Same process though. I also used dehydrated tomatoes as you did. I love it. I used it to add to homemade hamburger helper, and anything else I nedded to add tomato flavor to. My tomatoes didn't do well at all this year, so not much canning over here...and no dehydrating.

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  4. Thank you so much for sharing this! What a great idea...and this will definitely help with shelf space. Now to get those tomato plants to grow abundantly.

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  5. I dried my peels this year and ground them up. Thanks for the tips on how to use the powder now that it's done.

    It was very satisfying to peel the tomatoes, can them and dry the peels, leaving almost nothing for the compost or the chickens.

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  6. Wow, thanks so much for sharing this! I have never made it-never even heard of it. My tomatoes are gone for this year but I really want to remember it for next year. I do this with the last of my peppers though. I dehydrate them, grind them up and use them as a seasoning on just about everything. I use green and hot together, just whatever is left in the garden. I actually went up yesterday and gathered the last of them because we are looking for frost this weekend. Thanks again for sharing this and God bless.

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  7. I have a dehydrator in shipment now and a bucket full of tomatoes waiting on me. I think I will do this instead of canning them. Thanks for this post!

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  8. I use tomato powder on a regular basis and love it. Thank you for sharing the hydration ratios, I think I will print it up and tape it to my jar.

    Love your blog.

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  9. I stumbled across your blog looking for information about canning beans. I have enjoyed poking around on your posts. May I just compliment you on what a gracious woman and mother you seem to be. I appreciate what I have read so far. I struggled to adjust to motherhood, even though that is what I dreamed of doing my whole life. I worried about academics, not homemaking, all through school, so I am playing "catch up" on practical skills. However, while it took 5 years for me, I am finding joy in motherhood. Also, I am finding ways to adjust my attitude to enjoy my service in this regard. Your sweet blog is a blessing to me as I make these efforts. Thank you. I look forward to learning and reading more now that I found your site.

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  10. I absolutely NEVER thought about doing this! How awesome. And handy. Thank you (& your readers!) for this great tip.

    Sam

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  11. Thank you for the tomato powder tutorial. Like you I'm tired of canning and my shelves are full so I'm going to do this with the last of the tomatoes I had to harvest prior to frost earlier this week. They're still half green but when there are enough ready at a time I'll fill dehydrator trays.

    When you say your dehydrator full of tomatoes made over a pint of powder, how many trays did you fill?

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    Replies
    1. My dehydrator is a round one with nine trays.
      Gina

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  12. This is an awesome idea on using tomato powder. I dehydrate all the time and this is new to me. I think I will grab some of my dehydrated tomatoes off the shelf and make them into powder.

    Thank you for sharing this!
    Blessings,
    Amy

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  13. oh my goodness, what a clever way to make homemade tomato paste! I am going to borrow my mother in law's dehydrator next year and DO THIS. Thanks for sharing the details.

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  14. I did ketchup sauce from peeled tomatoes, as I have not the courage to disposed the peels, I decide to dry it. At my country (Argentine) food dehydrators are too expensive, I dried the peels by microwave. Well , I can i in a jar and store in the freedge, but I do not know what to do with it. You people inspired me! Thanks a lot for your recipes, comments and tips.

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  15. Dehydrated tomato powder is the only thing I use in cooking. We have hundreds of tomatoes from the raised garden beds. Due to health issues, canning is out of the question, but dehydrating is not. We prefer the taste of fresh tomatoes preserved with natural elements. When making skillet pasta with ground beef, I use beef broth instead of water. Huge difference in taste.

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  16. I ran across this topic researching what to do with tomato powder other than tomato juice, sauce, and paste.
    I'd like to add the benefits of dehydrating tomatoes (I have 16 quarts dried now in mason jars) instead of canning.
    For me, the preparation is easier. No skinning and peeling--just slicing.
    the lids can be reused and even lids from canned jars can be used for sealing dried foods.
    Space is such an issue. I got 15 dried tomatoes in a quart and a pint jar today.
    Want to haul a case of canned tomatoes vs. a case of dried tomatoes??
    When using a portion of dried tomatoes, I can reseal the jar and not have to refrigerate like with opening canned tomatoes.
    And the clean up is easier. No bowls where tomatoes were peeled.
    Not emptying the water bath is a plus.
    I can dry on the covered back porch and not heat the kitchen.
    Throw the trays and mesh trays in the tub and soak--clean up done.




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  17. I love growing tomatoes! But, what to do with all of them? I just recently discovered tomato powder. It is soooo easy! I wash them fresh from the garden, dry them and toss them into the blender. This tomato "sauce" dehydrates so much faster. Then I toss the tomato "leather" into the dry blender to make the powder. It takes less time (minus the dehydrator time) than going to the store and buying a can and driving back home. Thank you for your ratios. I live in Lancaster County PA and have buggies drive past my 1000 square foot garden every day. Love your blog and your sweet spirit!

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    Replies
    1. I love the idea of blending it first! Thanks!
      Gina

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  18. First time dehydrating for me! How long can I safely store the powder?
    Jen

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    Replies
    1. Hmmm....I'm not sure. I have some in the freezer from over a year ago and it is still as good as ever.
      Gina

      Delete
  19. I read the paper about the lose of vitamins in the storage of tomato powder. I'm wondering if storing the powder in a mason jar and using the "FoodSaver" attachment to remove all the air would may any difference. I going to do it anyway. I haven't decided if I will store it in the freezer or my cool basement. I love this idea!

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  20. Hi Gina,
    I just can not tell you how much I am enjoying your posts! Thank you for sharing!

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  21. Could you tell me is the ratio in teaspoon or tablespoon? Love this idea!

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    Replies
    1. Debra-
      Sorry for the confusion. This is teaspoons, but you can easily adapt it to tablespoons by increasing the ratios.
      Gina

      Delete

I'm still learning how to be a joyful homemaker and I'd love to hear from you!

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